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Death as a thread of Cultural and Religious Identity

By
Juana Paulina Carhuamaca Barbaran ,
Juana Paulina Carhuamaca Barbaran

Facultad de Medicina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Rosa Laura Cuitiño ,
Rosa Laura Cuitiño

Facultad de Medicina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Nilda Susana Gómez ,
Nilda Susana Gómez

Facultad de Medicina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Cristian Ezequiel Jaramillo ,
Cristian Ezequiel Jaramillo

Facultad de Medicina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Antonella Soledad Meza ,
Antonella Soledad Meza

Facultad de Medicina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Ileana Belen Nieto ,
Ileana Belen Nieto

Facultad de Medicina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Abstract

This article approaches death from an anthropological perspective, exploring its historical evolution and its influence on diverse cultures and societies. It begins by examining how anthropology has contributed to our understanding of death, from its roots in the supernatural to contemporary approaches. Three pivotal periods in anthropological death research are identified: the twentieth-century evolutionary, the heyday of symbolic anthropology, and the current interdisciplinary era. The analysis focuses on the impact of European colonization in the New World and how anthropology emerged as a tool for documenting and understanding cultural and religious changes among indigenous populations who encountered the colonizers. In addition, it explores funerary beliefs and practices in diverse cultures, from the Incas in Argentina to contemporary native cultures in the same country. It highlights rituals and conceptions of death in different religions, including Catholicism, Buddhism, Islam and others. The article underscores the importance of appreciating the cultural diversity surrounding death in a globalized world. Despite superficial differences, death remains a universal theme that raises fundamental questions about life and transcendence. Understanding how different cultures confront and give meaning to death is essential to promote cross-cultural empathy and respect in today's society.

How to Cite

1.
Carhuamaca Barbaran JP, Cuitiño RL, Gómez NS, Jaramillo CE, Meza AS, Nieto IB. Death as a thread of Cultural and Religious Identity. Community and Interculturality in Dialogue [Internet]. 2023 Dec. 25 [cited 2024 Jun. 23];4:96. Available from: https://cid.saludcyt.ar/index.php/cid/article/view/96

The article is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Unless otherwise stated, associated published material is distributed under the same licence.

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